From the Terminologist’s Toolbox: WIPO Pearl Terminology Database

I was honored to meet Cristina Valentini, Head of the Terminology Unit in the PCT Translation Division at WIPO (World Intellectual Property Organization) during the EAFT meeting that took place last year in Luxembourg. If you missed it, last year they released the latest version of their termbase WIPO Pearl that includes scientific and technical terms extracted from patents in 10 languages, with more than 7,000 terms and 500 new concept relations added. It also adds a new functionality to their Concept Map Search, a Concept Path Search that allows to find your “way” between two concepts showing all the related concepts in between. Terms can be searched further in PATENTSCOPE, a database that collects 58 million patent documents, including three million published international patent applications filed via the PCT (Patent Cooperation Treaty) system.”

WIPO Pearl also now includes Chinese and Portuguese in addition to the already-existing French, Japanese, Russian, and Spanish interface languages. Also under construction are the Arabic, German, and Korean versions.

The termbase contains over 127,000 patent terms and 17,500 patent concepts, all entered and validated by WIPO-PCT language experts. All PCT legal terms in Arabic, Chinese, English, French, German, Japanese, Russian and Spanish have been reviewed and validated by WIPO-PCT legal experts and awarded the highest term reliability score of “4”.

Last but not least, WIPO is collaborating with several universities to have students perform terminology work by providing bi- or trilingual terminology records in specific technical fields for inclusion in WIPO Pearl following their validation. They currently work with universities from Switzerland, France, Greece, and Illinois (USA), but they also ask other universities interested in participating in this collaborative initiative to contact them at their email address: wipopearl@wipo.int.

I was very happy to learn about this new release and about the collaborative work they are doing with universities, which is a great way to get students involved in formal terminology work. Congratulations to Cristina and her staff for the excellent work they are doing. I will keep you posted on future releases of this useful tool.

 

 

 

 

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